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How to care for your knife

Even the most basic of home cooks use a knife almost on a daily basis. If properly cared for, they could last you a lifetime and make preparing meals faster and more enjoyable. Here are some tips on how to keep your knives (and your chopping skills) sharp.

A chef’s knife in stainless steel is laying on top of a wooden chopping board next to a bigger chef’s knife.
A chef’s knife in stainless steel is laying on top of a wooden chopping board next to a bigger chef’s knife.

Handwash only

We recommend you hand wash your knives immediately after being used to prevent corrosion and eliminate any bacteria spreading from i.e. raw chicken to fresh vegetables. Hand wash with medium hot or lukewarm, soapy water and wipe dry. Avoid dropping knives into a pile of dishes soaking in the sink. By doing so, you risk that they could be dented by heavy pots and pans. Also, someone could be seriously injured if he or she unknowingly reaches into the water.

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See all dishwashing accessories

Keep your knives sharp

A sharp knife is safer to use than a blunt one, so it’s always a good idea to sharpen your knives regularly. Once a week is a good rule of thumb. Keep in mind that the sharpener should be made of a harder material than the steel in the blades. For this reason, you should look for a sharpening rod made of ceramic or chromium steel, a whetstone or a knife sharpener. Keep in mind that knife blades with serrated edges (i.e. bread knife) should be sharpened by a professional. Avoid cutting through frozen or very hard foods (for example bones), as this can cause the edge to bend or shards to loosen in the blade. If you cut into hard food, pull the knife back and forth through the food. Avoid rocking the knife from side to side.

See all sharpening tools
See all sharpening tools

Use a chopping board

We recommend you always use a wooden or plastic chopping board. By cutting on glass or metal surfaces you run the risk of making the knife dull or, even worse, damaging the blade. Remember that wood is easier on blades than plastic. Both wood and plastic are sanitary surfaces as long as they are frequently washed with a detergent and are free of deep scratches that can act as a breeding ground for bacteria.

See all chopping boards
See all chopping boards

Storing knives

One important aspect of caring for your knives that is easily forgotten is how to best store knives. Proper storing of knives prevents damage to the blades as well as minimizes risk of accidental cuts. Also, when a knife is properly stored, it prolongs the lifetime of the knife. It is recommended that you store your knives in a knife block, in a knife tray in a kitchen drawer or on a magnetic knife rack on the wall.

See all knives
See all knives