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Ideas for better sleep in a shared children’s bedroom

Sharing a bedroom is usually easier if you give both children room for privacy and expressing their individual personalities. This way they get enough me-space to learn to appreciate the advantages of sharing: the connection and sense of security in each other’s company.

A HÖVLIG children’s tent with a multicolour BUSENKEL rug and soft toys inside, between two different white extendable beds.
A HÖVLIG children’s tent with a multicolour BUSENKEL rug and soft toys inside, between two different white extendable beds.

Divide and darken the sleeping area

Blinds shut out daylight making it much easier to fall asleep and stay asleep. Adding a divider between the beds gives both children privacy that allows them to wake up and fall asleep at different times, without disturbing each other.

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Two white extendable beds, a HÖVLIG children’s tent on a multicolour rug and a partially drawn white block-out roller blind.
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Motion sensor night light

Nights tend to get calmer with a night light helping the kids feel more secure. But no need to leave it on. With a wireless motion sensor connected to the lamp the light comes on automatically when the children start moving about.

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A forest patterned BRUMMIG LED table lamp on a FLISAT children’s stool, plus a TRÅDFRI wireless motion sensor on the wall.
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A rug for sneaking silently

Rolling out a soft rug on the floor makes it easier to sneak off to the bathroom in the middle of the night, without waking your brother or sister. It also dampens the acoustics of the room so that daytime playtime doesn’t get too noisy.

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A harlequin/multicolour BUSENKEL rug, a table lamp on a stool and a white/red IKEA PS LÖMSK swivel armchair with a soft toy.
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A woman making two white extendable beds with multicolour BRUMMIG and BUSENKEL bed linen, plus picture ledges on the wall.
Letting the children pick colours and patterns for the bed linen makes it more likely that they will want to spend time in their own beds.

Magdalena SjöströmInterior Designer