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Recycled party decorations for NYE

Light chains, garland, baubles, gift wrap and boxes—put them to work in new ways for your New Year’s Eve party decorations.

You can make recycled party decorations from IKEA holiday products like VINTER 2017 gold garland, silver gift boxes and baubles and wrapping paper. Turn them into wall decor, table toppers and paper rosettes.
You can make recycled party decorations from IKEA holiday products like VINTER 2017 gold garland, silver gift boxes and baubles and wrapping paper. Turn them into wall decor, table toppers and paper rosettes.

1. Deck the walls with lights and garland. Use a light chain or two to put up ‘Happy New Year’ or your new year mantra. Straight pins, nails or removable tape can help you plan things out. Wrap the lights in shiny garland, so the text will pop whether the lights are on or off.

2. Craft a rosette backdrop from gift wrap. Cut paper and fold it accordion style. Then fold it in half to find/mark the middle. Tape around the middle. Extend the ends to meet. Staple together. For impact, vary the sizes and paper designs. Put them up as a backdrop along with sparkly gift tags.

You can repurpose christmas ornaments and gift boxes like silver and grey VINTER 2017 gift boxes from IKEA. Just cut holes in the tops of the jewel-shaped paper boxes. Then place a matching grey or silver ornament in each one. Glue if you need to.

3. Set the table with baubles and empty boxes. Save gift boxes and packaging. Leave the boxes as-is or paint/wrap them to your party colours. Cutting holes in the packages will hide the hangers. Got lots of baubles? Stick them all together for a centrepiece!

We love to see our customers get creative with our products. Go for it! But please note that altering or modifying IKEA products so they can no longer be re-sold or used for their original purpose, means the IKEA commercial guarantees and your right to return the products will be lost.

Made by
Interior designer: Emma Parkinson
Photographer: Andrea Papini
Writer: Marissa Frayer