A reusable living room update with textiles

Keep blankets, cushions and extra accessories inside the grey GRÖNLID chaise longue’s built in storage.

A reusable living room update with textiles

New textiles are an effective way to give your home a boost. See here how a few easy fixes can vitalise your living room, again and again. Even better, you can store next season’s look right in the furniture.

Your cosy nook by the window

It’s always a good idea to sink into a generous GRÖNLID chaise longue. Add warm, soft textiles and a LUDDE sheepskin, and you’ll get through winter in no time. With the arrival of spring, it can also help you with a seasonal renewal (keep reading).

You’re sitting on next season’s look

Besides having changeable covers, GRÖNLID opens to offer hidden storage to spare. So much, even, that your living-room style kit is neatly stored within – in wait for a new season.

IKEA interior designer Elin Stierna.

“Switching between two sets of covers and curtains is an easy, affordable way to get a sense of renewal, again and again. Also, your textiles will last for longer.”

Elin Stierna, IKEA interior designer

A seasonal change worth repeating

Celebrate spring with a change of mood and colour. Simply switching to another set of covers has a big effect. Include curtains, a rug and a lighter throw, and it will feel like a new room.

Lighter fabrics, sharper colours

The look and feel of a room is important year-round, but with different seasons come different needs. For spring, bring out another colour scheme and less warm textiles. By combining thick and sheer curtains, like SANELA and TIBAST, you can easily go from a focus on insulation to letting the sun shine through.

We love to see our customers get creative with our products. Go for it! But please note that altering or modifying IKEA products so they can no longer be re-sold or used for their original purpose, means the IKEA commercial guarantees and your right to return the products will be lost.

Made by
Interior designer: Elin Stierna
Photographer: Fredrik Sweger
Writer: Henrik Annemark