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IKEA TO INSTALL SOLAR PANELS ON EIGHT CALIFORNIA LOCATIONS
[National]  NEARLY 90 PERCENT OF ITS PRESENCE IN STATE (SEVEN STORES, ONE DISTRIBUTION CENTER)
CONSHOHOCKEN, PA – IKEA, the world’s leading home furnishings retailer, today announced plans to install solar energy panels on eight of its California locations. Pending governmental permits, installation can begin in late Fall, with completion expected in early 2011. Collectively, the eight buildings comprise nearly 90% of the IKEA presence in California, and will total 4.5 megawatts (MW) of solar generating capacity, nearly 20,000 panels, and an annual output of 6.65 million kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity. This effort represents the equivalent to reducing 5,268 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) in California – equaling the emissions of 914 cars or providing 580 homes electricity yearly (calculating clean energy equivalents at www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/calculator.html).
IKEA will be installing panels at its three stores in Northern California (East Palo Alto, Emeryville and West Sacramento), four stores in southern California (Burbank, Costa Mesa, Covina and San Diego) and at its distribution center in Tejon – one of the top ten largest rooftop commercial systems in the U.S. Specific information about each project is below:

• Burbank store – opened in 1990; store size: 242,000 SF on 6.4 acresSOLAR PROGRAM: 35,000 SF at 290 kW; 1,260 panels generating 421,300 kWh/yearEquivalent to reducing 334 tons of CO2, 58 cars’ emissions or powering 37 homes

• Costa Mesa store – opened in 2003; store size: 308,000 SF on 24 acresSOLAR PROGRAM: 30,000 SF at 248 kW; 1,078 panels generating 353,800 kWh/yearEquivalent to reducing 280 tons of CO2, 49 cars’ emissions or powering 31 homes

• Covina store – opened in 2003; store size: 325,000 SF on 12.5 acresSOLAR PROGRAM: 54,000 SF at 451 kW; 1,960 panels generating 651,800 kWh/yearEquivalent to reducing 516 tons of CO2, 90 cars’ emissions or powering 57 homes

• East Palo Alto store – opened in 2003; store size: 290,000 SF on 10.5 acresSOLAR PROGRAM: 36,000 SF at 302 kW; 1,316 panels generating 427,900 kWh/yearEquivalent to reducing 339 tons of CO2, 59 cars’ emissions or powering 37 homes

• Emeryville store – opened in 2000; store size: 274,000 SF on 15 acresSOLAR PROGRAM: 65,000 SF at 537 kW; 2,338 panels generating 760,300 kWh/yearEquivalent to reducing 602 tons of CO2, 104 cars’ emissions or powering 66 homes

• San Diego store – opened in 2000; store size: 198,000 SF on 10 acresSOLAR PROGRAM: 30,000 SF at 251 kW; 1,092 panels generating 366,400 kWh/yearEquivalent to reducing 290 tons of CO2, 50 cars’ emissions or powering 32 homes

• West Sacramento store – opened in 2006; 265,000 SF on 21 acresSOLAR PROGRAM: 69,000 SF at 573 kW; 2,492 panels generating 795,500 kWh/yearEquivalent to reducing 630 tons of CO2, 109 cars’ emissions or powering 69 homes

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• Tejon distribution center – opened in 2000; DC size: 1.8 million SF on 60 acresSOLAR PROGRAM: 216,000 SF at 1,800 kW; 7,980 panels generating 2.8 million kWh/yrEquivalent to reducing 2,278 tons of CO2, 395 cars’ emissions or powering 251 homes

“We are excited about this investment by IKEA in using renewable energy, reducing our carbon footprint, and improving the lives of the many people,” said Mike Ward, IKEA U.S president. “This approach is consistent with our commitment to sustainable building practices and we are thrilled that our evaluation determined these projects to be feasible for IKEA. We always are open to ideas for incorporating key environmental technologies and look forward to considering other opportunities as they arise.”IKEA, drawing from its Swedish heritage and respect of nature, strives to be a good business while doing good business and reflects an operating model designed to minimize impacts on the environment. Other sustainable efforts include: integrating innovative materials into the production process; working with Global Forest Watch to maintain sustainable resources; flat-packing our goods for an efficient distribution system; recycling approximately 75 percent of waste (paper, wood, plastic, etc.); and incorporating environmental measures into the construction of our buildings in terms of energy-efficient HVAC and lighting systems, recycled construction materials, low volatile organic compound emitting paint, skylights in our warehouse, and water-conserving restrooms.For the seven stores, IKEA contracted with Gloria Solar – the US Systems Integrator of the E-Ton Solar Group that recently completed a 600 kW program at IKEA Tempe, AZ and currently is constructing the largest US commercial project, a 5MW land mount in Arizona. For the Tejon distribution center – the largest IKEA U.S. building – IKEA contracted with REC Solar for the second largest single-roof commercial system in California. REC Solar is one of the largest U.S. solar installers, with more than 5,000 systems nationwide including 16MW in the retail sector the past two years. Both contracted companies are California-based.In the United States, IKEA already has: solar energy systems operational in Brooklyn, NY, Pittsburgh, PA and Tempe, AZ; solar water heating systems in Charlotte, NC; Draper, UT; Orlando, FL; and Tampa, FL; and a geothermal system has been incorporated into the store under construction in Centennial, CO.There currently are more than 300 IKEA stores in 38 countries, including 37 in the U.S. Since its 1943 founding in Sweden, IKEA, the world’s leading home furnishings company, has offered home furnishings and accessories of good design and quality at low prices so the majority of people can afford them. TIME listed IKEA as one of the top eight most global eco-conscious companies. IKEA incorporates sustainable efforts into day-to-day business and supports initiatives that benefit children and the environment. For more information, go to IKEA-USA.com.