ENERGY & RESOURCES

We’re creating positive changes

Forest with sun streaming in
For a long time we have been making more from less; it’s part of our heritage. We’re also busy turning waste into resources, sourcing food and materials in a responsible way and protecting natural resources. And because we want to become energy independent, we’re making the switch to renewable energy. Download the 2012 IKEA Sustainability Report PDF
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
CLIMATE & ENERGY
To change everything, we need everyone
Tackling what has now become one of humanity’s biggest challenges is something we can all commit to – making sure that our children and their children will have a safe and prosperous future on this planet.
Get a brief history of climate change and learn what we all can do to take action.
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 a blue background with a row of four wind turbines and white text
Support a 100 %
clean energy future
Sign the petition on momentforaction.org
€1 billion to tackle climate change
Urgent action is needed to tackle climate change. This is why the IKEA Group and the IKEA Foundation have made commitments totalling €1 billion.
Did you know IKEA Group will produce as much renewable energy as it consumes in its buildings by 2020?
Did you know
IKEA Group will produce as much renewable energy as it consumes in its buildings by 2020?
€600 million investment
in wind and solar
The new commitment builds on the €1.5 billion invested in wind and solar since 2009 in 314 offsite wind turbines and 700,000 solar panels on IKEA buildings.
€400 million investment
in people and communities
The IKEA Foundation’s funding commitment will strengthen poor communities’ resilience to climate change and help them adopt renewable energy technologies in their homes, schools, communities and businesses.
We’ve gone all in with LED
Did you know LED uses 85% less energy than incandescent bulbs and last up to 20 years?
Did you know LED uses 85% less energy than incandescent bulbs and last up to 20 years?
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
A room filled with IKEA products made from wood
WOOD
Naturally beautiful
We’re big fans of wood. It’s a living material that lends durability and warmth, ages beautifully and is both renewable and recyclable. That’s why we’re working hard to protect and conserve this important natural resource.
Using wood resources wisely
Wood is one of our most important materials and it’s used in many of our products. We continually look for ways to get the most out of the wood we use by designing our products to minimise the amount of material needed and increasing the efficiency of manufacturing.
For many years we have worked with others to increase the supply of wood from responsibly managed forests. We are one of the founding members of the Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC) and we now have 21 foresters working to ensure that all wood is sourced in compliance with our forestry standards and to increase the share of certified wood in our supply chain.
Our top five wood-sourcing countries are Poland, Germany, Russia, Sweden and China.
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Tai Wen works as a forestry specialist for IKEA to ensure that wood in China is sourced in a responsible way.
Forestry specialist measuring growth
Working with forestry standards
Our IWAY Forestry Standard sets clear requirements for all wood used in IKEA products - which include a ban on wood that has been illegally harvested - from sources involved in forest-related social conflicts, or from high conservation value forests. All suppliers must comply with the standard before they can start deliveries and we use audits to check compliance. Download the IWAY Forestry Standard PDF
IKEA hangers made from wood
Using wood from preferred sources
In addition to suppliers meeting our IWAY Forestry Standard, the volume of wood from preferred sources - recycled wood and wood from forests certified by the FSC - increased to 22.6% from 16.2% in 2012. We are aiming for 50% by 2017. Visit the FCS website to learn more
Our partnership with WWF
We work with WWF and others to combat illegal logging and promote responsible timber trade. IKEA and WWF have worked together since 2002 to support credible forest certification, and map and protect High Conservation Value Forests to secure biological and social forest values. So far we have helped to improve forest management in Europe and Asia, and contributed to increasing FSC-certified forest areas by around 30 million hectares in the countries where we work together. Visit the WWF website to learn more about our partnership
We support 13 WWF projects in 11 countries that aim for more responsible forest management.
A map of the world showing the 13 WWF projects that IKEA supports in 11 countries
Laos
Vietnam
Cambodia
Russia
China
Ukraine
Lithuania
Bosnia & Herzegovina
Romania
Bulgaria
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
COTTON
We’ve gone all-in for cotton
from more sustainable sources
We’re happy to announce that from 1 September 2015 onwards, all the cotton we use for IKEA products comes from more sustainable sources. This means that the cotton is grown with less water, chemical fertiliser and pesticide, while increasing profit margins for farmers.
It is important to note that some products (produced prior to 1 September 2015) may still be available for some time in the stores until they are sold out. This constitutes a very small volume and only a handful products.
Cotton farmer, standing in a cotton field, holding a cotton ball.
Through the Better Cotton Initiative, cotton farming has become better for the environment and the farmers who grow it.
Close up of ÄLSKAD baby blanket.
Why more sustainable cotton matters
Cotton is one of our most important raw materials. You’ll find it in many IKEA products, from sofas and cushions to bed sheets and mattresses. Although we love working with cotton, we were uncomfortable with the fact that conventional cotton is often harmful to the environment and the people who grow it.
When grown conventionally, cotton farming uses large amounts of chemicals and water. This practice often leads to significant health risks to famers, soil erosion and water scarcity. And since most cotton is grown on small farms in developing countries, many farmers struggle to make a profit.
So, we decided to find a way to tackle these challenges and made a commitment to improve the cotton industry.
Taking action to transform the cotton industry
Over a decade ago, IKEA began taking steps to transform the way cotton is produced. Along with WWF and others, we helped set up the Better Cotton Initiative (BCI), which aims to make global cotton production better for the people who produce it, better for the environment it grows in and better for the sector’s future by developing Better Cotton as a sustainable mainstream commodity.
Since 2005, we have been working with WWF to make cotton farming more sustainable. Our work began with 500 farmers in Pakistan. In the beginning they were reluctant about the idea of changing their cultivation techniques. However after one year, the results were significant enough to inspire more farmers to join our projects in India and Pakistan.
Through hands-on training and field schools, together with our partners we’ve helped around 110,000 farmers learn more sustainable farming methods. This initiative has allowed farmers to cut costs, increase their profits and improve their working conditions. As a result, they can afford a better quality of life for their families, including schooling for their children.
Cotton farmers kneeling down in a cotton field inspecting water tubes.
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Making a lasting impact
We’re pleased to have reached our 100% target, but we won’t stop there. IKEA is committed to creating positive change throughout the entire cotton industry. Our vision is that more sustainable cotton becomes a mainstream material - affordable and accessible to many people beyond our business.
Learn more about IKEA and WWF cotton projects
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
Clean, fresh water pouring over hands
WATER
Treating water with respect
Water is necessary for life – but clean, fresh water is something of a luxury in some parts of the world. That is why water, both when it comes to quantity and quality, is an important issue for us and our suppliers. Our goal is that by 2020, our home furnishing suppliers will be 30% more water efficient than in 2011.
Water treatment facility at an IKEA supplier factory in Bangladesh
Saving water in Bangladesh
One of our major textile suppliers in Bangladesh uses a significant amount of water for IKEA production: around 1.7 million m3 a year. In 2011/2012, as part of our Supplier Development Process, we launched a project together to cut water consumption at their site by at least 20% and to test our water recycling guidelines for textiles. The supplier installed 30 water meters around the plant to understand which process uses the most water.
We are monitoring water consumption in each process and reduction targets will be set across the textile production process, from bleaching to printing and dyeing. We’ve also identified several points where wastewater could be recycled and used elsewhere in the plant, and will run pilot projects to test potential solutions and savings.
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
WASTE
Recycling in the big, blue box
Not being wasteful and making more from less goes back to our roots. We want to economise with resources and this influences us every day. By the end of 2015 at least 90% of the waste from our stores and other IKEA operations will be sorted for recycling. Our long term goal is to send zero waste to landfill.
We strive for zero waste to landfill wherever possible in our store and other IKEA operations.
A recycling waste station in an IKEA store
Lightbulbs collected to be recycled
Bring your recycling to IKEA!
We want to make recycling as easy as possible, which is why we offer the possibility of recycling your waste in IKEA stores. Did you know that you can leave batteries and compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs at most IKEA stores? See what you can recycle at your local IKEA store
Customer recycling station at an IKEA store
DID YOU KNOW?
In 2012, 86% of waste was recycled across our operations
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PEOPLE & COMMUNITIES
Putting people first
We’re helping to create a better everyday life for people around the world. Learn about People & Communities