ENERGY & RESOURCES

We’re creating positive changes

Forest with sun streaming in
For a long time we have been making more from less; it’s part of our heritage. We’re also busy turning waste into resources, sourcing food and materials in a responsible way and protecting natural resources. And because we want to become energy independent, we’re making the switch to renewable energy.
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
Shipping more products, less air
We send our products around the world, but we would like to avoid shipping air at the same time. This is where “fill rate” comes in – the share of the space in trucks and containers that’s actually used. More products per load means fewer trucks, trains and boats and a sizeable drop in CO2 emissions. Our goal is to increase our fill rate from 63 percent (today’s rate) to 70 percent. That’s more than it sounds like, since weight restrictions often prevent us from filling containers and trucks all the way to the top.
IKEA store employee moving products stacked on a paper pallet
Switching from wood to paper pallets reduced our footprint of transporting IKEA products by 75,000 tonnes of CO2 per year.
VIDJA lamp
Going back to simple
We’re always looking for ways to improve products. For example, we redesigned our VIDJA lamp, making it easier to assemble by eliminating 24 of the 33 components. This reduced the packaging weight by 28% and because there’s less volume, we can fit 128 lamps on a pallet, where there were previously only 80 lamps. See the VIDJA table lamp
EKTORP sofa
Thinking outside the box
Sometimes when we think a product can’t be improved we decide to try anyway. One of our product designers found a way to pack the EKTORP sofa flatter and make the shipping box almost half the size. This cut down on shipping costs, lowered our CO2 emissions and lowered the price – with no change in quality! See the EKTORP sofa range
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
A room filled with IKEA products made from wood
WOOD
Naturally beautiful
We’re big fans of wood. It’s a living material that lends durability and warmth, ages beautifully and is both renewable and recyclable. That’s why we’re working hard to protect and conserve this important natural resource.
Using wood resources wisely
Wood is one of our most important materials and it’s used in many of our products. We continually look for ways to get the most out of the wood we use by designing our products to minimise the amount of material needed and increasing the efficiency of manufacturing.
For many years we have worked with others to increase the supply of wood from responsibly managed forests. We are one of the founding members of the Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC) and we now have 21 foresters working to ensure that all wood is sourced in compliance with our forestry standards and to increase the share of certified wood in our supply chain.
Our top five wood-sourcing countries are Poland, Germany, Russia, Sweden and China.
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Tai Wen works as a forestry specialist for IKEA to ensure that wood in China is sourced in a responsible way.
Forestry specialist measuring growth
Working with forestry standards
Our IWAY Forestry Standard sets clear requirements for all wood used in IKEA products - which include a ban on wood that has been illegally harvested - from sources involved in forest-related social conflicts, or from high conservation value forests. All suppliers must comply with the standard before they can start deliveries and we use audits to check compliance. Download the IWAY Forestry Standard PDF
IKEA hangers made from wood
Using wood from preferred sources
In addition to suppliers meeting our IWAY Forestry Standard, the volume of wood from preferred sources - recycled wood and wood from forests certified by the FSC - increased to 22.6% from 16.2% in 2012. We are aiming for 50% by 2017. Visit the FCS website to learn more
Our partnership with WWF
We work with WWF and others to combat illegal logging and promote responsible timber trade. IKEA and WWF have worked together since 2002 to support credible forest certification, and map and protect High Conservation Value Forests to secure biological and social forest values. So far we have helped to improve forest management in Europe and Asia, and contributed to increasing FSC-certified forest areas by around 30 million hectares in the countries where we work together. Visit the WWF website to learn more about our partnership
We support 13 WWF projects in 11 countries that aim for more responsible forest management.
A map of the world showing the 13 WWF projects that IKEA supports in 11 countries
Laos
Vietnam
Cambodia
Russia
China
Ukraine
Lithuania
Bosnia & Herzegovina
Romania
Bulgaria
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
A cotton grower holding Better Cotton
COTTON
One of our favourite materials
Cotton is a natural, renewable material that’s used in some of our best-loved products – from sofas and cushions to bed sheets and lampshades. We’re working hard to make cotton farming better for people and the planet.
What’s better about Better Cotton?
We love working with cotton because it’s soft, breathable and renewable. But conventional cotton farming is often harmful for the environment and the people who grow it. That’s why we work with farmers to raise standards, and strictly prohibit child labour in our supply chain. We also partner with organisations like the Better Cotton Initiative (BCI) and WWF so we can adopt a holistic approach to the complex sustainability issues surrounding cotton production. By the end of 2015, our target is that all cotton used will be produced in line with the BCI. Visit the BCI website for more information.
Sundar Borude, a cotton activist, teaches how to sustainably grow cotton
Meet a successful cotton farmer
Sundar Borude in the central Indian state of Maharashtra has become a “master trainer” and advocate for joint IKEA and WWF cotton projects that promote better cultivation practices. He teaches his neighbors the same simple measures – like using less chemicals and water – that have made his farm more profitable. Visit the WWF website to learn about our partnership
FÄRGLAV, a quilt cover made from a blend of cotton and lyocell
Finding alternatives to cotton
While cotton remains one of our most-used materials to work with, we’re constantly looking for alternative renewable materials. Our FÄRGLAV quilt cover blends cotton and lyocell, a soft, breathable textile fibre that comes from trees. See the FÄRGLAV quilt cover.
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
Clean, fresh water pouring over hands
WATER
Treating water with respect
Water is necessary for life – but clean, fresh water is something of a luxury in some parts of the world. That is why water, both when it comes to quantity and quality, is an important issue for us and our suppliers. Our goal is that by 2020, our home furnishing suppliers will be 30% more water efficient than in 2011.
Water treatment facility at an IKEA supplier factory in Bangladesh
Saving water in Bangladesh
One of our major textile suppliers in Bangladesh uses a significant amount of water for IKEA production: around 1.7 million m3 a year. In 2011/2012, as part of our Supplier Development Process, we launched a project together to cut water consumption at their site by at least 20% and to test our water recycling guidelines for textiles. The supplier installed 30 water meters around the plant to understand which process uses the most water.
We are monitoring water consumption in each process and reduction targets will be set across the textile production process, from bleaching to printing and dyeing. We’ve also identified several points where wastewater could be recycled and used elsewhere in the plant, and will run pilot projects to test potential solutions and savings.
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
WASTE
Recycling in the big, blue box
Not being wasteful and making more from less goes back to our roots. We want to economise with resources and this influences us every day.
We strive for zero waste to landfill wherever possible in our stores.
A recycling waste station in an IKEA store
Lightbulbs collected to be recycled
Bring your recycling to IKEA!
We want to make recycling as easy as possible, which is why we offer the possibility of recycling your waste in IKEA stores. Did you know that you can leave batteries and compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs at most IKEA stores? See what you can recycle at your local IKEA store
Customer recycling station at an IKEA store
Packaging is an important part of an IKEA product. It tells you what the product is and protects it for the journey home. However, packaging can also have a negative effect on the environment so it is important that we continuously improve how we work with it. In cooperation with the Australian Packaging Covenant, we have created an action plan that demonstrates our commitment to seek improvements to our product packaging to benefit our customers and our environment.
View the APC Action Plan for IKEA SA and WA here.
Packaging
ENERGY & RESOURCES: CLIMATE & ENERGY | WOOD | COTTON | WATER | WASTE | FOOD
FOOD
Food you can feel good about
We serve and sell food to 261 million customers a year through our store restaurants and Swedish Food Markets. Our approach includes using more sustainable and organic ingredients – which includes purchasing ingredients that have been certified to recognised standards and applying animal welfare standards.
A UTZ-certified farmer checks a coffee plant
All coffee sold and served at IKEA has been UTZ Certified since 2008.
WE ARE COMMITTED TO SOURCING FOOD IN A RESPONSIBLE WAY
The new IKEA children’s organic menu items
More organic choices than ever
You’ll always be able to find organic food in our Swedish Food Market. Also, we always provide one organic menu option in our restaurants, including a new children’s organic meal.
A bag of UTZ certified coffee beans
Proudly serving UTZ Certified foods
UTZ Certified is an independent organisation that recognises coffee, tea and chocolate that have been grown sustainably, and is one of the leading sustainability standards for these foods. Learn more at the UTZ website
Fresh salmon on a bed of ice
Responsibly sourced seafood
All wild-caught seafood must come from MSC (Marine Stewardship Council) certified fisheries or appear in the WWF Seafood Guide as species that come from healthy and well-managed populations. Visit the WWF website to download a Seafood Guide
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