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Milan fashion week

WRITER: HANNAH MAGNUSSON

A model dressed in clothes with abstract white/black patterns at the Milan fashion week.

This year IKEA decided to do something a bit unexpected: Partner up with some of the fashion industry’s coolest to create collections unlike any they’ve produced before. And the were both debuted on September 29th with gorgeous runway shows at Milan Fashion Week.

Fashion and textile designer Martin Bergström explored everyday life in India, finding inspirational patterns in unexpected places like distressed walls and cables hanging above the streets.

“When I came to India, I started seeing things like the amazing patina of surfaces, the textures of walls, and the patterns created by the monsoon rains. These imprints felt like the true India. Both abstract and organic, as well as modern and traditional – all at the same time,” says Martin.

Working together with 25 fashion students from NIFT, he created 15 patterns which were used as the base for all kinds of products, including textiles, bedlinen, rugs, paper items, bowls, glasses and metal objects. Our favourite part? While the entire collection was sourced and produced in India, it looks beyond the bold colours we’re all so used to seeing associated with the country, and favours a natural, monotone palette.

"Both abstract and organic, as well as modern and traditional – all at the same time."

Models dressed in clothes with abstract white/black patterns, on the runway at the Milan fashion week. And in the background the audience is taking pictures.
A model dressed in clothes with abstract white/black patterns, on the runway at the Milan fashion week.

In contrast, menswear and home textile designer Katie Eary’s collection, GILTIG, boasts bright bursts of colour. Just like IKEA, she believes that home is where you can put your personality fully on display, and aimed to create everyday pieces with tons of statement-making character. “A good home is not about having lots of flashy things, it’s about having things that complement your personality. When you walk into a home, it’s like you’re walking into that person’s brain,” says Eary. So what’s in Katie’s brain? Trippy, fun fish, eyeballs, cats and more. Motifs so out there that even when used on the smallest item, they can totally transform a space.

What’s more, the entire collection was created using digital printing, something new for IKEA that they’ll be exploring more of in the future.

Understated and modern, Bergström’s runway show was full of movement, while Eary’s GILTIG models sported giant eyeball helmets, showcasing two very different, yet creative, sides of IKEA.

A model in a colourful dress on the runway at the Milan fashion week.  And in the background you can see a white lamp shade with red eyeball pattern.
A model in an orange fur jacket together with red leather trousers decorated with white strings, on the runway at the Milan fashion week. And in the background you can see a white fabric with red eyeball pattern.

"When you walk into a home, it’s like you’re walking into that person’s brain."

A model in a white coat carrying a black bag with a red brain pattern and a big eyeball helmet, on the runway at the Milan fashion week.
A model in a white dress with red eyeball pattern, on the runway at the Milan fashion week. And in the background you can see a white lamp shade and a fabric, both with red eyeball pattern.
A model dressed in a short dress with turquoise eyeball pattern together with turqoise stockings, on the runway at the Milan fashion week. And in the background the audience is taking pictures.

And some more highlights…